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Mega GLA with Sesame Lignans

      Dietary derangement of essential fatty acids and prostaglandin synthesis can result in over-expressed DHT. Omega-6 fatty acids are well-supplied in the diet by meat and vegetable oils. However, not all omega-6 fatty acids are of equal value. Arachidonic acid (AA) tends to be unhealthy because it is the precursor of inflammatory eicosanoids — such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thromboxane A2, and leukotriene B4 — which promote inflammation, exacerbating hair loss. In contrast, gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), found in evening primrose oil, borage oil, and black currant oil, is an important fatty acid that plays a beneficial role in healthy prostaglandin (PGE1) formation, pro-inflammatory mediator reduction, 5 alpha reductase inhibition, and can be converted to vasodilator metabolites.

      Health-conscious people have been swallowing a lot of borage oil supplements to obtain GLA (gamma linolenic acid), the parent of the biologically active DGLA (dihomogamma linolenic acid).

      10 mg of sesame lignans are added to each softgel of Mega GLA borage oil. Sesame lignans not only increase beneficial DGLA but they also prevent the conversion of GLA into the proinflammatory mediator arachidonic acid.0 Blocking this pathway decreases the formation of destructive proinflammatory agents.

      Numerous studies document GLA’s multiple health effects. Enhancing this supplement with sesame lignans enables GLA to work much better in the body, allowing many more people with inflammatory-related problems to benefit from supplemental GLA.

      Directions:1-2 softgels (1,000-1,500 mg.), daily.

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